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  #11  
Old 11-07-2011, 11:45 AM
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The website opens. I posted my concern for the wonderful Rainbow environment we have been blessed with all these years. Please flood the site with your comments, to perpetuate Lee's Ferry for future generations.
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2011, 12:36 PM
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Done. Thanks for sharing.
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  #13  
Old 11-07-2011, 01:54 PM
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Input given! Thanks for bringing this up. It is an important issue.
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  #14  
Old 11-07-2011, 07:30 PM
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This is a big issue folks. Let them hear your voice. And our voice as the fishing community.

I made this a sticky and added all meetings to the calendar.
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  #15  
Old 11-07-2011, 07:56 PM
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Web-based Meeting

There will also be a Web-based Meeting. (Strange time, Tuesday afternoon.)

As found on this page - http://ltempeis.anl.gov/involve/pubschedule/index.cfm



A Web-based meeting will be held at 1 p.m. Mountain Time on November 15, 2011, in which the public will be able to link via the Internet to a live overview of the LTEMP EIS and ask questions of technical experts and managers. Those wishing to participate should follow the instructions below to join the meeting.

Meeting number: 685 027 390
Meeting password: GCWebEx

Go to https://doilearn.webex.com/doilearn/...=NNTgxY2YyZmNk
If requested, enter your name and email address.
If a password is required, enter the meeting password: GCWebEx
Click "Join".
Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.
Audio for the web meeting will be available over a toll-free phone line.

To connect to audio, dial 1-877-917-3611.
You will be connected to an operator who will ask your name, affiliation, and telephone number.
You will also be asked for a passcode before connecting you to the call – the passcode is 6711646.
The operator will moderate questions from the public over the phone.
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  #16  
Old 11-07-2011, 08:53 PM
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Just blew the Condit Dam on the Big White Salmon which is a tributary to the Columbia on October 27. Just Google "Condit Dam" and you will connect to links about the project. Opened up a huge area suitable for salmon and steelhead spawning.
My point is that without pressure from fisherman and fishing groups this would never have happened.
Not familiar with the fishery below Glen Canyon Dam, and I do want to fish Lee's Ferry sometime, but you need to get involved if you want to preserve the fishery. I cannot stress this enough.
Two dams already removed on the Rogue River in Oregon.
Snake River Dams are next.
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  #17  
Old 11-10-2011, 06:00 PM
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Keep the pressure on. If you attend a public meeting, ask what is being considered in the way of trout removal. These public meetings do not volunteer information unless you engage one of the insiders in discussion and ask.

Latest unpleasant rumor I've heard is removal very near the Lee's Ferry reach IS being considered. Supposedly the large amount of smallish fish and successful recent spawns makes an argument for those who don't like trout in the river to say it is OK to remove trout because the anglers would rather have fewer, larger trout anyway. I say that's not a good argument. Populations fluctuate naturally, not every year is good for spawning. Today's small trout are tomorrow's large ones.
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  #18  
Old 11-10-2011, 07:14 PM
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Last time I was up there they asked us at the boat ramp if we caught any tagged fish and whether we would rather catch many small ones or a few big ones. My understanding is they are trying to build arguments palatable to anglers for killing the trout just below Lees Ferry. They tag trout below Lees Ferry and try and claim that those trout swim up river crowding out the trout population up river, and that anglers would rather have a few big fish rather than many smaller ones. The more tagged fish reported caught up river, the more fish just below Lees Ferry they can justify killing.
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  #19  
Old 11-10-2011, 07:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beeyay View Post
Last time I was up there they asked us at the boat ramp if we caught any tagged fish and whether we would rather catch many small ones or a few big ones. My understanding is they are trying to build arguments palatable to anglers for killing the trout just below Lees Ferry. They tag trout below Lees Ferry and try and claim that those trout swim up river crowding out the trout population up river, and that anglers would rather have a few big fish rather than many smaller ones. The more tagged fish reported caught up river, the more fish just below Lees Ferry they can justify killing.
I for one would rather catch a few big ones than a lot of dinks. The rest of your post is pure assumption, IMO. Fish tagging studies are done for a variety of reasons and the data can be useful in managing the fishery to benefit anglers. We should always provide accurate information to persons creeling us at take-outs or while on the water. Your post implies we should be dishonest in our reports; not my style.
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  #20  
Old 11-11-2011, 09:27 AM
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Population estimates: If you mark X number of fish and anglers catch Y numbers of marked fish, it provides a ratio that can be applied to estimate the entire population size.

Growth rates: When fish are marked, their length and weight are recorded. Each time they are recaptured, you then have a time interval and a new set of measurements that tell biologists how fast the fish is growing.

Year class success: Marked fish allow biologists to follow individuals over time and determine how well that cohort has performed throughout its lifetime. This works particularly well when stocking, say, fingerlings. It can be used to gauge a particular strain of rainbows; the productivity of a certain water; depletion rates that help determine how frequently a water should be restocked.

And, yes, movement of marked individuals. Past studies have shown that Lees Ferry trout do not move downstream with any significant frequency. Recruitment of trout within the system (Colorado River) is known to be localized and not dominated by large in-stream migrations.

Asking other questions during the interview: Biologist often design interviews to gauge an anglers satisfaction with their experience. Such questions as 1) How many fish did you catch today? 2) How satisfied were you with your catch? 3) How would you rate the quality of your overall experience today? 4) Would you rather catch more smaller fish or fewer larger fish? Yes, that is an often asked question of anglers because it tells the managers how to best manage the fishery to attain the highest angler satisfaction. Some fisheries are more family oriented and best managed for a higher catch rate to satisfy the younger anglers and provide a meal back in the campground. Best to stock higher numbers of smaller fish in that fishery. Kids have more fun catching 4, 10" trout than one 14" trout. But as anglers gain more experience, they start to look for that "memorable fish." That term is actually used in fisheries management to refer to a fish the angler will want to photograph and will remember for many years. Lees Ferry is, once again, starting to produce 20" 'bows. Those are memorable but it takes a lot of protein to grow one. Bag limits can be used to reduce competition among smaller fish and allow more individuals to pass through a possible "bottle neck" that inhibits their growth to the memorable category.

Every fish population has a limiting factor in its environment that prevents the population from growing larger or individuals from growing larger. A carefully designed bag limit or size limit or slot limit can help create the kind of fishery anglers have said they want. By asking as many questions as an agency can afford to collect (creel surveys, data analysis, report writing all take time and money), they can help move a fishery toward what the anglers have said they want at any particular fishery.

Fisheries management is a complex set of variables confounded by the vagaries of weather and the environment. Most certainly I've missed some here, but hopefully you get the idea. When I'm interviewed by a creel clerk, I always do my best to accurately report my information and experience.

Last edited by stoneflynut; 11-11-2011 at 09:31 AM.
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