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  #11  
Old 06-01-2017, 08:31 AM
Pinetopbob Pinetopbob is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bucksnort View Post
Pinetop, when fishing with nymphs under a bobber, how deep are you? Are you near the bottom?
Oh my, I should have said "indicator". Depth varies with the lake and Carnaro is not very deep. Remember, the nymphs are coming off the bottom and working their way up to the surface so the depth can vary.
The osprey are also catching fish and I think the trout like to stay in the weeds until dark or cloudy overhead. Dang fish are smart.

Some movement with the nymphs usually helps also.
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  #12  
Old 06-01-2017, 09:49 AM
Pinetopbob Pinetopbob is offline
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Originally Posted by Bucksnort View Post
Pinetop, when fishing with nymphs under a bobber, how deep are you? Are you near the bottom?
I know an old guy who camps at Carnaro all summer and fishes with a spin rod with a clear casting bubble above one or two nymphs and he will crank in the flys after a long cast from shore. He always fishes early am or when cloudy and he uses some of my nymph flys to glide them through the water. Trolling is what he does and he kills the bows and lives at the lake all summer.
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  #13  
Old 06-16-2017, 09:06 AM
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MudBug MudBug is offline
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I was at Big Lake last weekend. Stopped by after a family Reunion just to drag some flies behind a casting bubble from shore for a couple hours. Once the sun went down, leaving just enough light so kind of see a midge hatch sent the fish in to a feeding frenzy. They were rolling on emergers all around the area I was fishing. Mostly small fish (4" - 6") but I saw some very large fish in on the feast too.

I ran back to my truck and grabbed my 1WT and caught 7 or 8 of the little ones and missed a bunch more because it was too dark to even see my fly. None of the big fish got fooled.

I was surprised at how big the midges were. In the dark I couldn't make out what they were but I took a picture of my pants legs, which were covered in them and later looked at the pics and the were giant midges.
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  #14  
Old 06-16-2017, 01:47 PM
Litespeed1 Litespeed1 is offline
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...no matter what, they are all bobbers!
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  #15  
Old 06-16-2017, 02:38 PM
Bucksnort Bucksnort is offline
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Litespeed1,

They're all bobbers - too funny. I refuse to use LOL, oops.

And speaking of bobbers, uh, I mean strike indicators, a retired Army sergeant from Ft. Carson, CO, by the name of Ed Marsh, was given credit for pioneering indicator fishing in the 70s. Ed Dentry, who was the outdoor writer for the Rocky Mountain News, gave him this accolade. I met Ed once at a Sportsman's Expo and thanked him for teaching me, in a round about way, how to nymph fish with cork strike indicators. Actually, he taught a good friend who taught me.

In those days, strike indicators were frowned upon, and still are, by a lot of fly fishers. While nymphing on the Platte near Deckers, many years ago, I struck up a conversation with a man and his son. I accidentally dropped one of my indicators. The kid picked it up and said, "here, you dropped your cheater".

A long time ago, I had a subscription to Fly Fisherman Magazine. In one of the last issues I received, there was an article by a contributing writer, John H. Sullivan, about strike indicator fishing. The title is something like, "Let's face it....: strike indicator fishing is not fly fishing". I still have an electronic copy of the article. Actually, I think he was a dry fly purist and didn't like anything that resembled a nymph. He wrote about how anyone with a nymph and an indicator could accidentally bump a trout on the nose and catch one.

I was a bit miffed because I thought this article belonged in the op-ed section and not the "how to" section so I wrote a letter to the editor. They did not publish my letter but someone from the magazine called me to tell me Mr. Sullivan had been writing articles for the magazine for along time. He also said that most of the anglers at the magazine use dries, nymphs, streamers and whatever else it takes. Oh well.

Here is another quick story about nymph fishing. I was in Cheesman Canyon one hot summer day. I was sitting on a large boulder in the river playing a nice rainbow when two dry fly anglers approached, fishing up stream. They could see I was playing a fish. As they walked by, one said so I could hear, something like, "you kill more fish nymphing than with dry flies". I've yet to figure out that one.

I am what you call a fly purist. I will fish dries, nymphs and streamers.

Last edited by Bucksnort; 06-16-2017 at 02:40 PM.
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