Arizona Fly Fishing Forums

Arizona Fly Fishing Forums (http://www.azflyandtie.com/flyforum/index.php)
-   General Discussion (http://www.azflyandtie.com/flyforum/forumdisplay.php?f=8)
-   -   Fire @ Blue Ridge (http://www.azflyandtie.com/flyforum/showthread.php?t=15825)

Seldomseen 04-28-2018 02:14 PM

Fire @ Blue Ridge
 
And it is not even May.

https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5763/

Seldomseen 04-29-2018 01:39 PM

Image from ADOT Twitter:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/Db-jJ9ZVAAAUIDJ.jpg


Saw the evacs have been ordered, hope the is no loss of life or property. Just gives me a knot in my stomach knowing what some of those folks are going through.

joe 04-29-2018 05:22 PM

Another priceless part of AZ going up in flames !!!!!!

Seldomseen 04-29-2018 05:45 PM

Hope everybody got out. Looks pretty rough up there this afternoon.

Chasintrout 04-29-2018 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joe (Post 171961)
Another priceless part of AZ going up in flames !!!!!!

Been happening for thousands of years...

almostlost 04-29-2018 07:08 PM

Just looking at that pic, notice how dense that forest is and how skinny the trunks are.
How close the grass is to the lower branches (ladder fuel)

How are the raptors suppose to even fly and hunt in a forest that compact?

I remember, even in my short years on this earth how large and spread out the ponderosa used to be. Not anymore.

joe 04-29-2018 10:46 PM

So far this year in AZ: 3 lightning caused fires and 436 human caused fires according to PHX Ch.5 local "fake news" channel.

joe 04-30-2018 10:12 AM

Payson Roundup, April 27th, before the Tinder (Blue Ridge) Fire


Unfortunately, a bone-dry winter, rising temperatures, fierce winds and tinder-dry fuels have made April hard to tell from June, say firefighters.

The Tonto National Forest responded this week by issuing 300 warnings and many citations between April 20 and 22 to people ignoring the urgent, Stage II fire restrictions.

The restrictions ban the use of wood and charcoal in campfires and food preparation, along with smoking outside of a building or vehicle, explosives, chain saws, welding torches, internal combustions engines without spark arresters, firearms and parking cars on top of vegetation.

Use of fireworks is always illegal in the national forests.

Violations come with a $5,000 fine and the possibility of six months in jail.

The restrictions now apply to Gila County, Payson, most of the White Mountains and the bulk of northern Arizona.

Disregard of restrictions has already caused major problems for firefighters, a full month before the normal peaking of the fire season.

A homeowner burning brush and weeds started the Indian Meadows Fire on April 23 near the Woodland Ranch area in the Coconino National Forest. The fire spread quickly to 100 acres, burning one home, several vehicles and several outbuildings.

Coconino County sheriff’s deputies evacuated homes in the area for a time, before the wind shifted and firefighters contained the blaze.

In the meantime, the human-caused Rattlesnake Fire southeast of Whiteriver this week expanded to some 21,513 acres and remains just 32 percent contained.

Some 544 firefighters spent the week trying to hem in the fast-moving fire. Helicopter crews set backfires from the air, hoping to deny fuel to the fire burning through ponderosa pine forests.

Early in the week, cooler weather helped crews battling the blaze on the San Carlos and Fort Apache reservations, as well as on the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests. The Forest Service closed the forest all around the edge of the fire, partly for public safety and partly to avoid hampering fire operations.

The predicted approach of dry thunderstorms today and Saturday could complicate the task of firefighters across the state.

The National Weather Service predicted a weak upper level low along the front range of the Rocky Mountains will push storms loaded with dry lightning down into Arizona, although temperatures will remain 10 or 12 degrees above normal.

The storms might bring a touch of rain, but also might simply deliver lightning bolts in a tinder dry forest — the kinds of conditions that normally don’t develop until late June — just before on the onset of the monsoon.

A lightning storm with dry, gusty winds will mostly affect Apache and Navajo counties, already suffering from severe drought.

Normally, Rim Country gets several inches of rain in April, dampening fire danger heading into the normally bone dry, hot months of May and June.

In decades past, the big fires mostly hit in June, weeks before the monsoon. But dangerous fire conditions have now expanded into April — with the region getting only a trace of rain in the past two months.

Worse yet, several major climate studies have suggested the overall rise in average global temperatures could delay the start of the monsoon — which normally delivers more than a third of Payson’s average rainfall.

A team of researchers from Princeton and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration publishing in Nature Climate Change even suggested the warming trend could dramatically reduce the average rainfall in the monsoon months in the Southwest, leading to sweeping changes in fire behavior and vegetation.

The new research takes into account a more detailed measurement of sea surface temperatures to model potential changes in the Southwest’s monsoon.

The predictions suggested the monsoon might not reach as far north — with the area above the Mogollon Rim now representing the normal, northern limits of the monsoon.

If that’s correct, the fire-dousing monsoon might not just come later — it might not come at all for some areas.

Chasintrout 05-01-2018 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joe (Post 171965)
So far this year in AZ: 3 lightning caused fires and 436 human caused fires according to PHX Ch.5 local "fake news" channel.

More than 3.5 human caused fires each day so far this year and already more than the entire years of 2015-2017. Maybe they're including back yard camp fires?

I wouldn't say "fake news" more like "misleading". I do wonder how bad those lightning caused fires would have been if not for all the resources we put to fighting them. My guess is a whole lot worse.

BunsbertMontcroffEsq 05-01-2018 03:19 PM

There is a chance of rain in Phoenix tonight and tomorrow. Hope the high country and the Tinder and Rattlesnake Fires get some rain too.....


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:13 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Logos, Trademarks are property of their owners. Other content Copyright 2006-2015 azflyandtie.com . All Rights Reserved.